Policy & Procurement

Government policy and regulation regarding the procurement and use of cloud computing technologies is still in its nascent stages. This portion of the SafeGov.org site focuses on current policy and procurement issues related to cloud adoption in the public sector, including analyses of Federal, state, and local issues, developments in higher education, and related laws, regulations, and directives.

Blog: What's Hot in 2015 for the Evolution of Federal IT

Ed Bender, AFCEA,  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

With 2014 in the rearview mirror, federal agencies now are looking ahead to what the next year will bring. For information technology (IT) professionals working in the U.S. Defense Department and intelligence community, 2015 will be the year of the cloud, application stacks, security challenges and centralization. How will each of these trends develop and impact government information technology infrastructures? Here is a look at a few changes in IT that will affect federal IT pros in 2015.

FedRAMP releases draft for higher security cloud computing authorization, seeks public input

Dibya Sarkar, Fierce Government IT,  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

The federal government Jan. 27 released a long-awaited draft document that establishes a high baseline of security controls for cloud computing service providers, allowing them to host some of the federal government's most sensitive information. The draft was released by the Joint Authorization Board of the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program, or FedRAMP, the government-wide program that is standardizing cloud security assessment and authorization. The JAB is made up of the chief information officers of the Homeland Security and Defense departments and the General Services Administration.

Future Forecast: Government technology in 2020

Robert Barkin, American City and County ,  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

At a time when technological change is measured in nanoseconds, experts in information systems are focused on longer-term trends that will position their communities to take advantage of the convenience and efficiency of technology. At the same time, they are working overtime to ensure the safety of their systems and protect vital information from hackers. Regardless of the benefits and potential dangers of technology, everyone agrees that technology in 2020 will only be more important.

Pace of IT biggest challenge for agencies moving to cloud

Susie Adams, Federal News Radio,  Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Susie Adams, chief technology officer for Microsoft Federal, sat down with Women of Washington to discuss how the government can leverage cloud computing solutions. On challenges the government faces when transitioning to the cloud, Adams said,"The biggest challenge is the pace of IT for the federal agencies, and the fact that we've moved to the fifth generation of computing at lightning fast speed. And nothing in the government moves at lightning fast speed." Adams explained how government agencies should be looking toward cloud solutions.

A Cautionary Government Cloud Story--UK's G-Cloud. Does The "G" Stand For Gone?

Ben Kepes, Forbes,  Tuesday, January 27, 2015

All would appear, however, to not be well with the G-Cloud. This despite the program seemingly proving very effective. Indeed total G-Cloud sales amounted to £270m by the end of September 2014, averaging £22m a month. That’s more than double the £120m sales predicted by 2014/15 by the inaugural program director, Denise McDonagh, back in 2012. Despite this success however the initiative is being rebranded as a “Digital Marketplace” and the rebrand includes an overhaul of the back end platform that powers the marketplace. It seems that the pressure is on to morph G-Cloud into a much broader digital services store – perhaps a noble idea but one which will take the focus away from the simply, but highly effective, G-Cloud.

Federal IT Leaders Want Cloud Vendors to Provide Clarity

Kenneth Corbin, CIO,  Friday, January 23, 2015

Federal agencies are actively shopping for new cloud computing technologies, but vendors will help their cause by packaging their services to be more readily implemented in a government environment that is highly security conscious and almost preternaturally cautious about rolling out new IT systems.

The key to understanding the gap between the vision and reality of cloud computing

Chris Widemann, Washington Technology,  Wednesday, January 21, 2015

In the 1990s, Alan Greenspan, then chairman of the Federal Reserve, referred to the attitudes surrounding the overvalued dot-com market as “irrational exuberance.” I’m beginning to feel the same way about cloud technology as a sales cure-all for government clients. Not that the bottom is going to drop out of the cloud market – far from it. There does seem, however, to be some “unmerited optimism” about relying on the technology as a door opener. The cloud has taken on almost a magical quality among those who sell to government. Many vendors and integrators believe that having a cloud story is the key to winning government contracts, no matter what their core business may be.

Getting IT Right? How State Governments are Approaching Cloud Computing

Kevin Desouza and Gregory Dawson, Brookings,  Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Cloud computing is far more than just a simple technology change and requires a close examination of governance, sourcing, and security. We sought to understand how well state government is prepared to address the challenges of cloud computing.

New cloud era begins at DoD

Aaron Boyd, Federal Times,  Monday, January 19, 2015

"I think there is some genuine, real excitement about going to the cloud in the DoD," said Gregory Garcia, executive director of the Army Information Technology Agency. Initial forays into the cloud are likely to be uncoordinated and small in scale. Once the cloud concept proves successful with those early endeavors, more ambitious enterprise-scale projects will likely follow, experts like Garcia say. "As we build success stories of those early adopters, we'll see more people embrace that idea," Garcia said. "Five years from now, I think it's going to be all in the cloud."

DISA security guide outlines future of DoD cloud

Aaron Boyd, Federal Times,  Wednesday, January 14, 2015

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) released new cloud security guidance Tuesday, effectively codifying how Defense Department agencies will use commercial cloud products. The new guidelines — a response to a policy released by DoD Office of the CIO in December — specify what can be placed in public clouds, what needs to be contained within a virtual environment and what data must be kept on physically separate networks.