Android’s recent encryption announcement doesn’t protect your data

Karen Evans by Karen Evans, KE&T Partners
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Apple’s default encryption announcement contained a notable distinction in the fine print. They promised not to read the content of your email messages. Not only will Apple’s default encryption protect your email from being accessed by governmental entities without permission, but Apple will not retrieve or use the content of your email for their own purposes. Android’s announcement did not offer the same protection to users. They did not make the same pledge which could be related to the fact that Google’s main source of revenue is derived from ad placements based on the content of user emails and searches.

Most cloud apps flout EU data protection rules – study

John Leyden, The Register,  Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Three in four cloud services do not conform to the current EU Data Protection Directive, according to a new study. Enterprise cloud visibility firm Skyhigh Networks found that nearly three-quarters (72 per cent) of the cloud services used by European organisations do not meet the requirements of the current privacy regulations, with data being sent to countries without adequate levels of data protection. The transfer of personally identifiable information outside Europe meant many services were operating at odds with the EU Data Protection Directive.

The Brave New World of HIPAA Enforcement (Part 4)

Daniel J. Solove by Daniel Solove, TeachPrivacy
Monday, October 20, 2014

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations govern health information maintained by various entities covered by HIPAA (“covered entities”) and other organizations that receive health information from covered entities when performing functions for them. HIPAA is enforced by the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Will new commercial mobile encryption affect BYOD policy?

Adam Mazmanian, FCW,  Monday, October 20, 2014

While law enforcement is up in arms about new default data encryption on Apple iOS and Google Android devices, experts say the policy could have some benefits for federal mobility as well.

Restoring Privacy in the Era of Big Data

Kris Alman, Student Privacy Matters,  Sunday, October 19, 2014

A parallel explosion of big data since 2001 is not coincidental. Big data utopians proclaim better integration of fragmented health and education sectors and data analysis will improve outcomes and improve value. The question never seems to be asked, “For whom?”

Where Government Leads: Designing For User Choice

Julie Anderson by Julie Anderson, Civitas Group
Wednesday, October 15, 2014

When used to benefit the individual, "choice architecture" helps citizens make better choices. It means thinking hard about software defaults. Rarely is government far ahead of the technology sector in cutting-edge policies designed to produce better results. Surprisingly enough, that is exactly what is happening with techniques that empower citizens to make optimal decisions related to economics, resource allocation, and privacy.

Who Are the Privacy and Security Cops on the Beat? (Part 3)

Daniel J. Solove by Daniel Solove, TeachPrivacy
Monday, October 13, 2014

In the United States, a variety of different regulators are responsible for overseeing and enforcing different laws that impact different types of information. Some laws are exclusively enforced by agencies. Some are also enforced by state attorneys general. Others are enforced exclusively with a private right of action – the ability of individuals to bring lawsuits. Several laws have criminal penalties, which are typically enforced by the Department of Justice (DOJ). And then there are laws that are enforced by a combination of means, such as the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) which is enforced by two agencies plus private rights of action.

Twitter, the FBI, and cloud computing: The disclosure dilemma

David Linthicum, InfoWorld,  Friday, October 10, 2014

Twitter filed a lawsuit against the FBI and the Department of Justice on Tuesday to publish a full "transparency report," which documents government requests for user information. Its objective is to gain more information about government surveillance of its users. The published report does not include national security requests -- Twitter has been prohibited from disclosing that information. But Twitter believes it's entitled under the First Amendment to "respond to our users' concerns and to the statements of U.S. government officials by providing information about the scope of U.S. government surveillance."

Microsoft says NSA spying hit trust in the cloud

Doug Drinkwater, SC Magazine UK,  Friday, October 10, 2014

A senior Microsoft spokesman says that government surveillance has damaged trust in the cloud and in the company itself, pushing the latter to focus more on data privacy and security. The firm's principal cyber-security strategist Jeff Jones was presenting at the IP Expo Europe exhibition in London on Thursday, where he suggested that the leaks from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden had impacted the Redmond technology giant and the cloud computing market as a whole. He then suggested that that the leaks had ‘affected' cloud in the enterprise, as well as the company's own ambitions in this area, before adding that the growing distrust in the cloud had come at a time where ‘perceptual concerns' around cloud security were dissipating on deployment.

The Privacy Pillory and the Security Rack: The Enforcement Toolkit (Part 2)

Daniel J. Solove by Daniel Solove, TeachPrivacy
Thursday, October 09, 2014

Are privacy and security laws being enforced effectively? What kind of sanctions do privacy and security laws use for enforcement? In this post, I will discuss the various tools that are frequently used in the enforcement of privacy/security laws.