Privacy

How Europe is fighting to change tech companies' 'wrecking ball' ethics

Julia Powles and Carissa Véliz, The Guardian,  Monday, February 01, 2016

Facebook, Google, Amazon and other internet behemoths are involved in a form of technological innovation that is acting as a “wrecking ball”, the president of the European parliament declared in Brussels this week. “The aim is not just to play with the way society is organised, but instead to demolish the existing order and build something new in its place,” said Martin Schulz. “The internet lost its innocence long ago.”

How Europe Protects Your Online Data Differently Than the U.S.

Mark Scott and Natash Singer, New York Times,  Monday, February 01, 2016

Your digital footprint can quickly extend far and wide and be used in multiple ways. Your interactions on Facebook shape the ads you see there. The kinds of films and music you stream may allow online companies to make inferences about your political leanings or religious beliefs. And your health insurer may analyze details about your online shopping habits. How much control do you have over how companies collect and use your information? And what mechanisms are in place to protect your data against misuse?

The Morning Risk Report: Big Data Raises Growing Privacy Risk Concern

Stephen Dockery, Wall Street Journal,  Friday, January 29, 2016

Jay Cline, a data protection and privacy leader from PwC, said that “big data is the newest privacy risk … Privacy used to be a two-dimensional risk, but that’s all changing.” The PwC experts argued that “recognizing the importance of big data and privacy means having policies to handle the creation and capture of data from start to finish” and “it also means knowing when to stop.” “Current technologies might exceed the amount of data that’s appropriate to gather,” they said.

There is No Privacy Without Security

FIDO Alliance,  Thursday, January 28, 2016

Today is Data Privacy Day 2016 and, as a Champion organization, we want to join in the conversation on the importance of respecting user privacy online, and the ways FIDO authentication standards do just that. To this end, we have released today the ”FIDO Privacy White Paper,” which describes how privacy has been taken into account in the design of the FIDO protocols, and how they can help meet privacy requirements from certain regulatory authorities. To understand why FIDO authentication standards were designed with a user-privacy focus, it’s important to first understand how privacy relates to security in the context of accessing online services.

Privacy Considerations For Evolving Video Surveillance

Bradley Shear by Bradley Shear, Law Office of Bradley S. Shear
Wednesday, January 27, 2016

During President Obama’s final State of the Union address earlier this month, he drew attention to the rapid pace of change brought about by technology and innovations, explaining that these changes are “reshaping the way we live, the way we work, our planet, our place in the world. … And whether we like it or not, the pace of this change will only accelerate.” The president could not be more correct. While the world has significantly changed since President Obama took office in 2009, the laws and regulations governing the technology that has driven this change have not kept pace.

Despite Consensus on All Police Wearing Body Cams, Implementation Questions Remain

Michael Maciag, GovTech.com Digital Communities,  Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Another important policy decision police are grappling with is how long they’ll retain the footage. It’s a safe assumption that most departments would prefer to keep it for longer, but because of the cost of data storage, that's just not feasible, said Jeff Gould, president of SaveGov.org, an online forum of IT experts.

Safe Harbor countdown continues as Pritzker says it’s ‘pens down’ time

Kate Tummarello and Alex Byers, POLITICO,  Monday, January 25, 2016

It’s now T-minus seven days until Europe's self-imposed deadline for replacing the transatlantic data-transfer agreement invalidated this fall by the European Union's highest court. The focus of the debate over the last few days has been at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, where U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker provided her most detailed read-out yet on the U.S.'s "comprehensive offer" to Europe. It includes "seven pathways for EU citizens to address their concerns" about how U.S. companies handle their data. U.S. agencies, including the FTC, have agreed to "significant new frameworks and commitments."

Europe’s Top Digital-Privacy Watchdog Zeros In on U.S. Tech Giants

Mark Scott, New York Times,  Monday, January 25, 2016

One thing is clear, she says: The practices of American businesses, and tech companies in particular, are squarely in her sights. “American companies do not have an immediate right to collect data on our citizens,” Ms. Falque-Pierrotin, 56, a blunt-speaking career civil servant, said recently in an interview, her voice increasingly animated. “If they are on our soil, then they need to live with the consequences.”

The fight for the privacy of students and cellphone users moves to US states

John Ribeiro, PC World,  Thursday, January 21, 2016

The fight for privacy is moving to U.S. states with 16 states and the District of Columbia introducing legislation on Wednesday that address issues such as requiring permission before student data is shared for non-educational purposes and the requirement of warrants before using cell site simulators to track phone users.

Take-up of cloud storage in Europe affected by privacy issues

Bryan Betts, Computer Weekly,  Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Cloud storage is hot, so we are told. It will rejuvenate your company, offload all that troublesome and expensive on-premise hardware, and help you ready staff and applications for Generation Mobile. But when we look at European organisations, we see a somewhat different – and, dare one say it, more realistic and nuanced – response to the preachings of the technology evangelists.